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Kruger National Park

The Kruger National Park is one of the most unspoilt natural eco-systems left in Southern Africa. It is always exciting to view the Big Five… elephant, lion, leopard, rhino and buffalo (which incidentally got this title as the five most dangerous
species to hunt). But, don’t overlook the other Big Five… giraffe, hippo, cheetah, wild dog and hyena, which make up our Big Ten!

This wildlife area is home to some 33 species of amphibian, 115 species of reptile and 140 species of mammal, including all the big game species that were nearly wiped out by the hunters of the nineteenth century.

Approximately 470 bird species have been recorded here, more than half of Southern Africa’s total!

What makes Kruger so special is its vastness. This is not a 5000 hectare game ranch; it is 20 000 square kilometer wilderness!

All species exist in this ecosystem very much as they did thousands of years ago… before humans plundered their other habitats.

Although the dry months of August and September are probably the best for game-viewing, the bush at this time is dry and harsh. Every month has its appeal though.

Once the rains break, usually October or November, a metamorphosis occurs, and within a few weeks the arid bushveld is transformed into a verdant jungle.

The game at this time generally disperses as many species are no longer reliant on the perennial rivers and waterholes.

Game viewing does become more difficult, but the birdlife improves as migrants return from the north to feast upon the increased insect life brought on by the rains.

The rainy season begins in September or October, peaking in December, January and February and tailing off in March and April.

The winter temperatures are wonderful for visitors, who often find the lowveld summers rather hot. Max temperatures average 23 C in July and 30 C in January. Average daily minimums are 8 C and 18 C respectively.

At Bushwise Safaris we are passionate about the preservation and protection of this ecosystem, so join us on a Bushwise Safari.

Let us be your hosts and guides